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 Post subject: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Mar 03, 2013 10:13 am 
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I'm excited for what the future holds this year!

http://backtoedenfilm.com/#movie

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Mon Mar 04, 2013 8:40 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 8:48 am 
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Hey Jon, how's the BTE garden going? The down the road neighbors have a nice commercial chipper-shredder I can use if I get it running for them (replace hydraulic lines; tune-up, service). Thinkin' about shredding me a big pile, tossing in some nitrogen, and letting her get cooking.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 9:52 am 
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temu wrote:
Hey Jon, how's the BTE garden going? The down the road neighbors have a nice commercial chipper-shredder I can use if I get it running for them (replace hydraulic lines; tune-up, service). Thinkin' about shredding me a big pile, tossing in some nitrogen, and letting her get cooking.


Man, it was a disaster with the back garden's spring planting because I just didn't have time to tend it with school, but the chickens sure enjoyed tearing it to bits. I've learned my lesson for the summer planting, and now that school is out, I'm about to expand my back garden twice as big, and put up a chicken barrier. However, I have had a few veggies sprout with garlic, onions, and Wandering Jew and Stone Crop, with the occasional corn or carrot. Herbs are good this year.

The front garden is lush and green, and I have not watered it at all this year. The large, tall mounds that I built around the trees and landscaping in the front circle has settled into an amazing bed, like a forest interior, and everything has flourished. My roses came out double and stayed red until last week whey they started turning dead. I'll see about some dried molasses with them pretty soon. My red buds did very nicely this early spring, lots of pink flowers. But the best were the Japanese ligustrums that are still in full bloom and smelling sweet.

Beyond that, I decided to xeriscape the front acre, and the weeds and wild flowers made an amazing presentation this spring. I have a pregnant nanny goat in mind for that spot... :smile:

How's your Ponderosa managing? I predict the meat varieties are massive along your ridge lines. :good:


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Jun 09, 2013 10:44 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
temu wrote:
Hey Jon, how's the BTE garden going? The down the road neighbors have a nice commercial chipper-shredder I can use if I get it running for them (replace hydraulic lines; tune-up, service). Thinkin' about shredding me a big pile, tossing in some nitrogen, and letting her get cooking.


Man, it was a disaster with the back garden's spring planting because I just didn't have time to tend it with school, but the chickens sure enjoyed tearing it to bits. I've learned my lesson for the summer planting, and now that school is out, I'm about to expand my back garden twice as big, and put up a chicken barrier. However, I have had a few veggies sprout with garlic, onions, and Wandering Jew and Stone Crop, with the occasional corn or carrot. Herbs are good this year.

The front garden is lush and green, and I have not watered it at all this year. The large, tall mounds that I built around the trees and landscaping in the front circle has settled into an amazing bed, like a forest interior, and everything has flourished. My roses came out double and stayed red until last week whey they started turning dead. I'll see about some dried molasses with them pretty soon. My red buds did very nicely this early spring, lots of pink flowers. But the best were the Japanese ligustrums that are still in full bloom and smelling sweet.

Beyond that, I decided to xeriscape the front acre, and the weeds and wild flowers made an amazing presentation this spring. I have a pregnant nanny goat in mind for that spot... :smile:

How's your Ponderosa managing? I predict the meat varieties are massive along your ridge lines. :good:


Lol. "Meat varieties along the ridgeline..." Seems Gail has them all as full-time employed with the task of lawnmowing in his yard...

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Mon Jun 10, 2013 7:07 am 
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You could take quite a few of em out with a Ruger .22 equipped with a Fram oil filter suppressor.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 6:48 pm 
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I finally got my lazy ass in gear and planted my garden in the back field this summer. I have been laying out my own mulch from chicken manure, along with the tree mulch compost that was already laid out previously, and things are turning up pretty fine. Cucumbers, beans, squash, tomatoes, pumpkins, watermelons, and cantaloupe are all in and growing nicely. This "back to Eden" gardening works really well...

Terry, any idea how to take pictures on my Samsung and post them on here?


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 8:20 pm 
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We did a "kinda back-to-eden" garden this year as well as last year. It is JUNGLE and producing very well. It is basically a lasagna garden layered on top of last year's garden:

1st layer - newspaper/cardboard
2nd layer - grass clippings
3rd layer - a year's worth of manured pine shaving bedding from the barn and chicken coop
4th layer - year's worth of kitchen compost

The beans and cucumbers are coming on strong, carrots are stretching out, onions are getting very bulbous, the tomatoes are about to ripen, and we've been eating the bok choy and romaine for a while. And cabbage is my new favourite garden thing. Beautiful and delicious...

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 11:35 pm 
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Wow!

Thank you sooo much for posting that video. I keep getting so over whemed w/ the weeds.

I did learn from the mistake of thinking that tilling the weeds w/ a shovel would be a quick fix. Oh my! The weeds came back emediately and seemed much worst than before.

I am going to get on the phone and see if I can't get someone to give me lots of wood chips.

I also do have lots of hay type grass (cant remember what it is called). I am going to do some mulching tomorrow.

I also need to remember to not get so frustrated and go to God for answers more.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 9:31 am 
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All I did was go to the county dump and get three yards per trailer load of this awesome, rich tree mulch compost, and it lays out perfectly with my big pitch fork. It's all I've done, no extra work needed. Just lay it out, and it kills the weeds if you put at least a half a foot layer down. Any weeds that should pop up are so easy to pull out, it's not even funny. I raked my back garden smooth and ended up with a lot more after. You can grow right in it!

Vector, at my county recycling place, they have big dump trucks that load the stuff, but I think it ends up being about $100/dump haul. But if you can get a tree service nearby to come dump on your place, they will probably do it for free if it's on their route.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 11:33 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
All I did was go to the county dump and get three yards per trailer load of this awesome, rich tree mulch compost, and it lays out perfectly with my big pitch fork. It's all I've done, no extra work needed. Just lay it out, and it kills the weeds if you put at least a half a foot layer down. Any weeds that should pop up are so easy to pull out, it's not even funny. I raked my back garden smooth and ended up with a lot more after. You can grow right in it!

Vector, at my county recycling place, they have big dump trucks that load the stuff, but I think it ends up being about $100/dump haul. But if you can get a tree service nearby to come dump on your place, they will probably do it for free if it's on their route.


I doubt I am on anyone's rout. LOL

Yeah they had that at the county dump close to me old house and I used it for walkways and flower gardens. I hope I can find that here.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Thu Oct 24, 2013 5:44 pm 
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Well folks, I do not know how to sell this surplus of massive, succulent zucchini squash that I have on my table. I have about a dozen plants in my mulch garden that are about six-by-six-by-three feet in diameter, all producing crazy volumes of squash; I have dozens of pumpkin plants, all producing about a hundred or more fruit; cantaloupe; watermelons; and a sad array of some cucumber plants (that I cannot figure out why they do not produce, save one giant example); new beans and winter garden babies are up too! but I still do not know what to do with all this surplus, even after family and I have devoured our fair share of it. Any suggestions?

Sorry for bragging. This is the most important thing I have learned in a long time, this "back to Eden gardening." Thanks again, WhiskeyReb! I still do not own a tiller! :)


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 9:41 am 
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Well, now since you have an accomplished Edenic thumb, the wife is gonna be drilling you for info. Made the mistake of sharing that film with her...now she is on me about getting her some shreddings piled up to start the seasonal cooking. Did you put nitrogen on your shreddings? The 25 minute down the road neighbor has a commercial chipper that needs work, but is available to me when I am ready to mulch/chip.

Been thinking about gathering the chipper piles from the road where they masticated during the fire instead!

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 10:13 am 
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All that I have ever done is get three yards of composted tree chippings/grindings per trip in my trailer from these mountains of mulch at the county dump. I just lay it out about six or eight inches thick on the new spot and wait a couple of months and then plant right in it. It is so easy! Once my babies pop up big enough to call plants, I stop watering, and they draw water from the dew and spring that comes up. It is crazy how full of water these fruit are!

For you, all you would have to do is get your tractor and scrape out a nice big pile *minus the red dirt* of that good stuff under your trees and pile it up for a little while. On that video, Paul goes into his woods out back and shows that good ole stuff under his pine trees that he rakes out with his hands; it looked like ready to grow in soil to me. You could probably just rake a nice mound away from your trees that has been rotting there for years and rake it out in a spot and grow right in it. I can't imagine them rotten pine needles and shavings ever needing any additives. The only thing that I ever add to my compost garden is more compost that I rake out of the chicken house (poop and hay and such). I think chicken manure compost is loaded with nitrogen, but I have a spot that my pumpkins grow in that I never added anything to except the composted tree mulch, and the plants are massive with lots of fruit. The soil tests that Paul did on his ranch showed that his mulch soil is peak in everything, so I cannot imagine ever needing to add nitrogen or others to this stuff.

I will say this, though, that Paul and the rest of that crew on the Back to Eden video do a lot of other added, unnecessary work--Paul sifting out the particulates from the "shake" and that other dude from Pennsylvania and his family adding newspaper and mushroom soil down first before the mulch--I do not do any of that stuff. I don't have the time, nor the patience, AND I am far too lazy to sift particulates into a wheelbarrow then unload it. The only thing that I have ever done is scalp the spot that I am about to grow in, and then lay out a trailer load of mulch. That's it! After it has sat there for a few months, I grow right in it from there, scraping a deep rivet into the mulch with my baseball field rake (got me a nice one online that does a damn good job in a short amount of time), and I generally plant my seeds a little bit farther apart than the instructions say because the plants grow bigger in mulch than the directions indicate.

It's a funny circle of life: I feed my chickens the leftover squash/pumpkins/etc., and they provide excellent compost food for next season's garden.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:46 am 
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Hmmm. I was under the impression that to breakdown fresh shreddings it had to sit and cook for a year, with the nitrogen added to aid the process...that if applied directly the first year, all the nitrogen would be leached out of the soil.

Fresh pine needles are very acidic. This year is a big needle drop here. I'd hate to have to separate pine needles.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 1:03 pm 
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My understanding is the only way for nitrogen to get leached out of the mulch is to till it into the soil, which is a no no. I think if it just sits there, directly applied as a covering, that it should be alright if it is already composted mulch, but I could be wrong.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 4:23 pm 
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Man, now that I think about it, I'd hate to mess with a bunch of needles too. I wonder if these folks have mulch:

Cal Sierra Transfer Station
(209) 536-1690
19309 Industrial Dr, Sonora, CA 95370

I mapped it, but my internet is acting funky.


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 5:21 pm 
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Ha..been there! Hate that place.

I understand the fungi needs nitrogen to breakdown the fresh material into usable form. Yours was fresh cut woodchips or something else?

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:41 pm 
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temu wrote:
Ha..been there! Hate that place.

I understand the fungi needs nitrogen to breakdown the fresh material into usable form. Yours was fresh cut woodchips or something else?


Mine is composted tree mulch: wood chips, grindings, saw dust, bits and chunks, soil--sat long enough to "smell" like soil, rich and organic. I have toadstools in my garden right now. :good: What I really need is a big dump truck load of this stuff on my backside... Wife is talking cheese now, so I figure we get a few goats for milk and meat, and a Jersey cow for her milk to make butter and cheese. Next, I'll attract everybody's bees and they can come live here with me and make honey! :spiteful:


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2013 6:45 pm 
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I've been studying Al Swearengen lately. Wife and I watched all of Deadwood over the summer--crazy shit, man! but that old Al sure was a shrewd individual. I lust for more land these days to get me a horse barn too... looking around, googlemapping... gotsa get me a bigger piece soon.

Edit: then again, I am seeing myself more and more these days as Sheriff Bullock. :s_crazy


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:04 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
temu wrote:
Ha..been there! Hate that place.

I understand the fungi needs nitrogen to breakdown the fresh material into usable form. Yours was fresh cut woodchips or something else?


Mine is composted tree mulch: wood chips, grindings, saw dust, bits and chunks, soil--sat long enough to "smell" like soil, rich and organic. I have toadstools in my garden right now. :good: What I really need is a big dump truck load of this stuff on my backside... Wife is talking cheese now, so I figure we get a few goats for milk and meat, and a Jersey cow for her milk to make butter and cheese. Next, I'll attract everybody's bees and they can come live here with me and make honey! :spiteful:


Got it. You got the ready to grow mix. Sounds like a plan right there. Dang Texas, you be expanding--big time! I haven't even got the chickens yet, but did 'doze out a spot for the coop...for after winter.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:10 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
I've been studying Al Swearengen lately. Wife and I watched all of Deadwood over the summer--crazy shit, man! but that old Al sure was a shrewd individual. I lust for more land these days to get me a horse barn too... looking around, googlemapping... gotsa get me a bigger piece soon.

Edit: then again, I do seeing myself more and more these days as Sheriff Bullock. :s_crazy


Lol. We'll have to start calling you Montana then! Yeah, ol' Al could do some deep thinkin', eh? :spiteful: Have you watched "The Wire" series from HBO? How about "Rome"? Those are kick-arse too.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 9:10 am 
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temu wrote:
Texas Jon wrote:
temu wrote:
Ha..been there! Hate that place.

I understand the fungi needs nitrogen to breakdown the fresh material into usable form. Yours was fresh cut woodchips or something else?


Mine is composted tree mulch: wood chips, grindings, saw dust, bits and chunks, soil--sat long enough to "smell" like soil, rich and organic. I have toadstools in my garden right now. :good: What I really need is a big dump truck load of this stuff on my backside... Wife is talking cheese now, so I figure we get a few goats for milk and meat, and a Jersey cow for her milk to make butter and cheese. Next, I'll attract everybody's bees and they can come live here with me and make honey! :spiteful:


Got it. You got the ready to grow mix. Sounds like a plan right there. Dang Texas, you be expanding--big time! I haven't even got the chickens yet, but did 'doze out a spot for the coop...for after winter.


Just a little bit at a time, but I see the end coming soon, at least it feels like it. I'd like to be a simple farmer before I go out, whichever way that is. But finding this source of covering so close by and FREE! to boot, man, I have got to cover this place up! Get me some fruit trees and nuts. You know more about that. How far apart should I plant peaches, pears, apricots, walnuts?


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 9:13 am 
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temu wrote:
Texas Jon wrote:
I've been studying Al Swearengen lately. Wife and I watched all of Deadwood over the summer--crazy shit, man! but that old Al sure was a shrewd individual. I lust for more land these days to get me a horse barn too... looking around, googlemapping... gotsa get me a bigger piece soon.

Edit: then again, I do seeing myself more and more these days as Sheriff Bullock. :s_crazy


Lol. We'll have to start calling you Montana then! Yeah, ol' Al could do some deep thinkin', eh? :spiteful: Have you watched "The Wire" series from HBO? How about "Rome"? Those are kick-arse too.


Though I've never been, I have always had a love affair with Montana ever since I saw Lonesome Dove, and them dudes down in South Texas stole all those longhorns from Mexico and drove em up to Montana... Yezzir!


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 9:57 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
Just a little bit at a time, but I see the end coming soon, at least it feels like it. I'd like to be a simple farmer before I go out, whichever way that is. But finding this source of covering so close by and FREE! to boot, man, I have got to cover this place up! Get me some fruit trees and nuts. You know more about that. How far apart should I plant peaches, pears, apricots, walnuts?


These days, tree planting space goes by variety/size. Lot's of different applications. When we farmed walnuts, our trees were 20' apart. I've seen them much closer these days...so close that the orchards are dark when the foliage is full.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 10:02 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
temu wrote:
Texas Jon wrote:
I've been studying Al Swearengen lately. Wife and I watched all of Deadwood over the summer--crazy shit, man! but that old Al sure was a shrewd individual. I lust for more land these days to get me a horse barn too... looking around, googlemapping... gotsa get me a bigger piece soon.

Edit: then again, I do seeing myself more and more these days as Sheriff Bullock. :s_crazy


Lol. We'll have to start calling you Montana then! Yeah, ol' Al could do some deep thinkin', eh? :spiteful: Have you watched "The Wire" series from HBO? How about "Rome"? Those are kick-arse too.


Though I've never been, I have always had a love affair with Montana ever since I saw Lonesome Dove, and them dudes down in South Texas stole all those longhorns from Mexico and drove em up to Montana... Yezzir!


We used to always vacation in Montana years back. Had several friends there to visit. From what I understand now, all our favorite spots along the Bitteroot and up the road to Canada (next to the Bob Marshal wilderness) are pretty packed with people these days. Not like it use to be in big sky country.

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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:39 am 
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Probably because Hank lives there, and people are drawn to his "country folk can survive" anthem that he still beats out. Or it could be the new drive along the I25 corridor, new boom jobs in IT and healthcare, from Denver to Missoula. People can afford to live off the grid on a ranch if they sink six figures as web design architects (what my old guitar player does).

Update on my garden: I now have babies popping up like gangbusters in broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts... :)

Now, I am waging battles with my hens against who's gonna eat the pumpkins first! :|


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sun Oct 27, 2013 11:43 am 
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temu wrote:
Texas Jon wrote:
Just a little bit at a time, but I see the end coming soon, at least it feels like it. I'd like to be a simple farmer before I go out, whichever way that is. But finding this source of covering so close by and FREE! to boot, man, I have got to cover this place up! Get me some fruit trees and nuts. You know more about that. How far apart should I plant peaches, pears, apricots, walnuts?


These days, tree planting space goes by variety/size. Lot's of different applications. When we farmed walnuts, our trees were 20' apart. I've seen them much closer these days...so close that the orchards are dark when the foliage is full.


Dang, 20' for walnuts. Will keep that in mind.

I was thinking the other day about the time you told me about running the tractor for your dad on his farm around those trees really close, reminded me of the time I carved a deep groove in my pear tree with my tractor, I got so close. No more with this mulching. Shoot, I'll just sit the ball right on the ground and cover it up with a mound of mulch and plant onions around it! :s_biggrin


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:11 am 
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Terry, how much did you pay, all total, on your solar panel and batteries, etc., if you don't mind me asking? I think it's time to get outfitted on my piece...

Getting my sustainable permaculture expanded, well dug, gas setup, and solar panels working, all now priorities for me. Meat production, check; garden producing like gang-busters, check; wind-turbine and solar panes, ex...


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 Post subject: Re: Back to Eden
PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 10:33 am 
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Texas Jon wrote:
Terry, how much did you pay, all total, on your solar panel and batteries, etc., if you don't mind me asking? I think it's time to get outfitted on my piece...


'Round about $8500-9000 for everything...panels are much cheaper now though. I bought Outback brand controller and inverter---pretty much bulletproof. Just had to plunk down $2200 yesterday for a new Honda generator (220v) yesterday for the spring pump. I eventually want to go solar with that too, then have all the excess from the below the pond spring to be returned into the large pond. All that will require a new pump as well as PVC all the way BACK down the hill from my water tank.

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