Joyfully Growing in Grace and Torah

Growing in Him
It is currently Sat Aug 19, 2017 10:52 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 51 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 1:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:58 pm
Posts: 1229
I used to be a big political person. I loved to defend the Constitution, the founding fathers, state rights, 2nd amendment, etc.

Used to . . . until I started this walk. Now, I couldn't care less. I have peace that surpasses all understanding, and what happens, happens.

I just sit here and hope and pray for His return.

:good:

_________________
Teshuvaami.com Forums


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:36 am
Posts: 355
I've been interested in politics for a long time for some reason. I have had to step back some over the years when I've gotten a little too wrapped up in things. I've even had people try to get me to run for different positions - I'm not interested in that.

I do believe He is in control just as many of our founding fathers did. I just think we have to make a stand from time to time. I write a lot of letters and even meet with anyone who will speak with me. I've been involved for years now. My biggest current battle is about the 2nd Amendment and I'm doing all I can to help Texas move towards allowing teachers and school staff to carry in school to protect our children.

Plus, I took an oath.



I tend to believe something similar to the following quote:

"Stand your ground. Don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here." by Captain John Parker

I understand that not everyone agrees with keeping up with politics so I'm not trying to step on toes. I do intend to stand my ground.

_________________
Joshua 24:14-15


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:20 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:19 pm
Posts: 428
Location: Iowa
lemon_fresh wrote:
I used to be a big political person. I loved to defend the Constitution, the founding fathers, state rights, 2nd amendment, etc.

Used to . . . until I started this walk. Now, I couldn't care less. I have peace that surpasses all understanding, and what happens, happens.

I just sit here and hope and pray for His return.

:good:


I too have lost interest in the above and wait [trying to be patient :blush:] for His return also.

And I give you credit Joshua for what you're doing.

_________________
My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge...Hosea 4:6


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:09 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
lemon_fresh wrote:
I used to be a big political person. I loved to defend the Constitution, the founding fathers, state rights, 2nd amendment, etc.

Used to . . . until I started this walk. Now, I couldn't care less. I have peace that surpasses all understanding, and what happens, happens.

I just sit here and hope and pray for His return.

:good:


Well, I'm stuck in YOUR old days. I still love and defend my Constitution, but more, the Declaration of Independence. On that critical day, I suppose, the Bible will be in my right pocket, and the Libertarian playbook in the other, but pistolas in both hands! :biggrin:

Messiah will return to establish his people of the Book! :tease:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2013 8:19 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
Personally the Articles of Confederation did a better job seeing as the states had their own constitutions which the federal only mimicked, but the federal constitution will suffice I suppose. They just needed to fix the military problem which was a pressing issue with the barbery pirates....muslims who pushed us into big govt....sound familiar?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2013 4:34 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
priest wrote:
Personally the Articles of Confederation did a better job seeing as the states had their own constitutions which the federal only mimicked, but the federal constitution will suffice I suppose. They just needed to fix the military problem which was a pressing issue with the barbery pirates....muslims who pushed us into big govt....sound familiar?


Damned straight! Dude, you are really solid in your history, my man. Kudos...

I find it VERY interesting that we had Articles of Confederation at our earliest prosperity, our earliest Providence as Thirteen Colonies because Israel in its earliest prosperity and Providence comprised Thirteen Colonies of Jacob's tribes, and Torah was their Articles of Confederation...

:good:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
Texas Jon wrote:
priest wrote:
Personally the Articles of Confederation did a better job seeing as the states had their own constitutions which the federal only mimicked, but the federal constitution will suffice I suppose. They just needed to fix the military problem which was a pressing issue with the barbery pirates....muslims who pushed us into big govt....sound familiar?


Damned straight! Dude, you are really solid in your history, my man. Kudos...

I find it VERY interesting that we had Articles of Confederation at our earliest prosperity, our earliest Providence as Thirteen Colonies because Israel in its earliest prosperity and Providence comprised Thirteen Colonies of Jacob's tribes, and Torah was their Articles of Confederation...

:good:


That's it bro, most people just don't know the history.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
I too stepped way back from politics since I realized that most of the "conservative" christians who are real active hold to dominionist theology. I'd never trade one set of thugs for another...especially not for an ultra religious set.

I did have to rejoice at Jonathan Cohn's address at the inaugural breakfast the other day.....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:36 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
I honestly do not know what I am except a scripture-seeking Libertarian. I know I am not a Conservative in the very essence of its generally known connotation because King Solomon said, "Stay away from the harlot's house, and don't go near her door; stay off her street even." Notice Solomon did NOT say, "I am King, I will stamp out prostitution." I do not condone prostitution, but I do not legislate against it either. Why is it that we Americans seek to legislate our Protestant legislation upon the masses, when not every one of us is Protestant. Conservatives are the reason why I can't buy hooch on Sundays. How blatant and in your face is that, that we live in a Romish system. Why is it any man's concern that I like Johnny Walker Black as my sore throat tonic...

Jonathan Cohn. Cool name. I'll have to check that out. Have not seen the vid yet, but I will when I get the chance.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 7:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
There's a sticky for it on COC over at TOL. As links keep going down, foolks over there keep putitng up active ones. there is a permalink at Cohn's website.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2013 10:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 3:58 pm
Posts: 1229
That message was powerful!

Word is that it keeps being removed to the the video using the Presidential Seal, which is under Copyright.


Riiiiight

lol

Adding on to the whole 13 colonies/13 tribes thing, the Pilgrims and many of the other groups saw themselves as Israelites (many, if not most even kept Sabbath, feasts, and ate clean) who were being led across the water to the promised land by God Himself.

_________________
Teshuvaami.com Forums


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
lemon_fresh wrote:
That message was powerful!

Word is that it keeps being removed to the the video using the Presidential Seal, which is under Copyright.


Riiiiight

lol

Adding on to the whole 13 colonies/13 tribes thing, the Pilgrims and many of the other groups saw themselves as Israelites (many, if not most even kept Sabbath, feasts, and ate clean) who were being led across the water to the promised land by God Himself.


ZACKLY!! :good:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
Interesting too that Esau had twelve sons. And now that the US and Britain have turned, we are being morphed into Esau.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
PURITANS WERE MORE JEWISH THAN PROTESTANTS

Hugh Fogelman





A Puritan is a name often misunderstood. During the 17th century English Civil War (known as the Puritan Revolution), the Puritans were Protestant fundamentalists who wished to “purify” the Church of England. Some of the Puritans, known as Separatists “separated,” forming their own church. The Puritans felt that Parliament, and not the King, should have the final say and that the moral guidance for all legal decision should come from the Jewish Bible which they considered to be the highest authority in all matters.



The Puritans were obsessed with the Bible and came to identify their political struggle against England with that of the ancient Hebrews against Pharaoh or the King of Babylon. Because they identified so strongly with ancient Israel, they chose to identify with the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible). (World Book Encyclopedia & Encyclopaedia Judaica) In 1620, the “Separatists” sailed for America on the Mayflower. The Separatists/Puritans who settled at Plymouth Colony called themselves “Pilgrims” because of their wanderings in search of religious freedom. The Puritan culture of New England was marked from the outset by a deep association with Jewish themes. No Christian community in history identified more with the Israelites of the Bible than did the first generations of settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, who believed their own lives to be a literal reenactment of the biblical drama of the chosen people―they were the children of Israel and the ordinances of God’s Holy covenant by which they lived were His divine law. Since they viewed themselves as the persecuted victims of the sinful Christian establishment of the Old World (England), the Puritans also had a natural sympathy for the Jews of their own time. The Protestant Puritan leader Cotton Mather repeatedly referred to the Jews in his prayer for their conversion as God's "Beloved People.” The New Israel―The influence of the Hebrew Bible marks every step of the Puritan exodus to their Zion in the wilderness of the New World. The Jewish Bible formed their minds and dominated their characters; its conceptions were their conceptions.



The "Separatists,” ready to depart from England for the new land, fasted in a manner reminiscent of the fasts held by the Israelites before any new undertaking. Their Pastor Robertson read I Samuel 23:3-4 and then they sailed to the New Canaan in America. The biblical basis for this procedure is manifest; just as the ancient Israelites prayed and fasted before undertaking an uncertain venture, so did the Puritans. And once settled in America, the custom was retained and frequently renewed. Early in 1620, the very year of the Pilgrims' landing in the new Plymouth, a solemn day of prayer was observed; Pastor Robinson spoke, again quoting from I Samuel 23:3-4, by which he strove to ease their fears and strengthen their determination. This custom, combining prayer and fasting with biblical readings on momentous occasions, persisted and as late as 1800, President Adams likewise called a national day of prayer and fasting.



The next major group of Puritan settlers to arrive in New England (1630) was headed by John Winthrop (1588–1649) and founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony. They were ruled initially by an elite of leading Puritan families - since the colony itself was based on biblical principles and was moved by the Puritan spirit of the Scriptures—was the Holy Jewish Bible. The Puritans wholeheartedly believed that it was their special mission to establish in America a society precisely modeled on the precepts of Sacred Jewish Scriptures. The Massachusetts Bay Colony was at the very least a state inspired by and thoroughly devoted to the Jewish Bible. "If we keep this covenant," Governor John Winthrop assured his people, "we shall find that the God of Israel is among us, but if we deal falsely with our God... we be consumed out of the good land whither we are going." The Jewish covenant concept was thus the bedrock of all Puritan religious communities.



When the Puritans, a bitterly persecuted people by the English government, reached America, they drew clear analogies between themselves and the Jews of antiquity. They constantly referred to the Hebrew Bible, renewing the similarities to their own experience, so that its philosophy and spirit came to permeate their lives. Also, like Israel of old, the Pilgrims (and their fellow Puritan counterparts) regarded them-selves as the elect of God, so that throughout the Revolutionary War they visualized their enemies as Amalekites or Philistines. And in a manner reminiscent of the traditional Jewish Passover night, the Pilgrims too memorialized their passage into freedom. In searching the Scriptures for readings pertinent to their own situation, the Puritans readily discovered the general similarity between themselves and the ancient Israelites, and proceeded to draw from it some very particular conclusions. They firmly believed that the Hebrew prophets were speaking to them as directly as they had spoken to the Israelites. Thus the history of the Israelites as related in the Bible served, according to the ministers of the day, as a mirror in which the Puritans could see their own activities reflected. Still considering themselves as Christian Protestants, the Puritans related to the Israelites and their Jewish belief for their fundamental “grounding.



In this respect they differed sharply from the majority of traditional Christian theologies. To the Puritans the primary lesson of the Old Testament was that a nation as well as an individual could enter into a covenant with God. The Puritans reasoned in America the concept of the covenant would assume new dimensions. Once they reached the colonies a new factor entered into the matter of the covenant. In this New Israel the Puritans established a completely new society based solely upon the Jewish concept of a covenant between God and man. Thus the Puritans made certain of the biblical system they wished to establish in the New World. When, during a convention of Puritan ministers at Boston on May 26, 1698, they confirmed the belief that "under the Old Testament, the Church was constituted by a covenant." Because of this concept, the Puritan Church was not ruled by a formal and rigid papal hierarchy but derived its direction immediately from God, ruled by His word as revealed in the sacred Jewish Scriptures.



The Bible was in all circumstances and for all occasions the ultimate source of knowledge and precedent. The Jewish Bible was the inspired word of God which was for them a matter of absolute conviction, and, hence, indisputable. Accordingly, failure to abide by the strict reading and literal interpretation of the Scriptures was severely punished: If any "Christian, so called,” spoke contemptuously of the Scripture, or the holy penmen thereof, they were to be punished by fine or whipping. Laws were also passed punishing those who violated the Sabbath. Laws and regulations adopted by them, which, at the present day, are stigmatized as singularities, were in many instances, the legitimate fruits of their strict adherence to the teaching of the Bible.



Most of the official acts of the colonies were determined by the Jewish Scriptures. One of these, the Connecticut Code of 1650, adopted a near Mosaic form of government. Its fifteen Capital Laws, Pentateuchal citations and language are later found in the Massachusetts Code of 1660. The guide of early Connecticut was Thomas Hooker, a man deeply touched by the Bible and its spirit, and called by some "the founder of American democracy." He wrote in a letter (1648) to Governor Winthrop of Massachusetts on the subject of liberty under the law: Sit liber judex, as the lawyers speak. Deuteronomy 17:10–11: "Thou shalt observe to do according to all that they inform, according to the sentence of the law. Thou shalt seek that Law at his mouth: not ask what his discretion allows, but what the Law requires." The Puritans' incorporated the Mosaic code and injunctions from the Old Testament into their own legal framework. It is worthy of note that fully half of the statutes in the Code of 1655 for the New Haven colony contained references to or citations from the Old Testament, while only three percent referred to the New Testament.



Accordingly, the first settlers in New England called themselves "Christian Israel." Comparison of the Puritan leaders with the great leaders of ancient Israel—especially Moses and Joshua—were common. So the names of Daniel, Jonathan, Esther, Enoch, Ezra, Rachel and a host of others were in constant use among the Puritans. Interestingly enough, there was a conspicuous absence of the names of Christian saints. Names of cities, towns and settlements likewise derived from Hebraic sources. This widespread use of biblical names, however, was not confined to the naming of offspring, cities and towns - names of many biblical heights were eventually bestowed upon the great mountains of America. Mount Carmel and Mount Horeb, home of the Prophets, were popular names, as was Mount Nebo, the final resting place of Moses. Names like Mount Ephraim, Mount Gilead, Mount Hermon, Mount Moriah, Mount Pisgah, were all popular as well. Some mountains in the New World were even called Mt. Sinai, Mount Zion and Mount Olive. .
.
Puritan obsession with the Bible led them to try and incorporate many aspects of the Jewish commandments into their lifestyle based on their literal interpretation of Hebraic laws. One of the most significant was the concept of the Sabbath as a day of rest and meditation. Puritan Sabbath observance began at sundown and no work of any kind, even household chores, was allowed for the next 24-hours. Sabbath observance was strictly monitored by local officials.



In summary: The majority of the earliest settlers were Puritans from England. Unlike their cousins back home, these American Puritans strongly identified with both the historical traditions and customs of the ancient Hebrews of the Old Testament. They viewed their emigration from England as a virtual re-enactment of the Jewish exodus from Egypt: England was Egypt, the English king was Pharaoh, the Atlantic Ocean their Red Sea, America was the Land of Israel, and the Indians were the ancient Canaanites. They were the new Israelites, entering into a new covenant with God in a new Promised Land.

These settlers found themselves in a New World which had no existing laws or govern-ment. Their first task, therefore, was to create a legal framework for their communities and the first place they looked for guidance was the Hebrew Bible. Thus most of the early legislation of the colonies of New England was determined by Scripture. The most extreme example was the Connecticut Code of 1650 which created a form of fundamentalist government based almost entirely on Jewish law using numerous citations from the Bible. The same held true for the code of New Haven and many other colonies.

At the first assembly of New Haven in 1639, John Davenport clearly declared the primacy of the Bible as the legal and moral foundation of the colony: "Scriptures do hold forth a perfect rule for the direction and government of all men in all duties which they are to perform to God and men as well as in the government of families and commonwealth as in matters of the church ... the Word of God shall be the only rule to be attended unto in organizing the affairs of government in this plantation."

Thanksgiving which has evolved into a national day of feasting and celebration was initially conceived by the Pilgrims, in 1621, as a day similar to the Jewish Sukkot, the holiday of joy as told in Leviticus 23:40. It was for the Puritans and is for the Jews a day of great joy because it was the time of the year for the gathering grain and fruits from their fields into their homes. A time for introspection and prayer, because it was God, not man who allowed the first harvest.





Notes



1. H. B. Alexander, "The Hebrew Contribution to the Americanism of the Future" in: The Menorah Journal, VI, no. 2 (1920), 65–66.

2. W. De-Loss Love, Jr., The Fast and Thanksgiving Days (1895), 61–62.

3. Cf. S. Morgan, "Responsibilities of a Puritan Parent," More Books: The Bulletin of the Boston Public Library, XVII, no. 4 (1942), 141–159.

4. S. Broches, Jews in New England (1942), 4–6.

5. J. Davis, New England's Memorial (1669), 36.

6. C. Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana (1702), III, 100; cf., Appendix, Bay Psalm Book.

7. P. Miller, The New England Mind (1939), 475.

8. Ibid., 477.

9. I. Mather, The Order of the Gospels (1700), 30.

10. P. Miller and T. H. Johnson, The Puritans (1938), 49, 54.

11. J. Banvard, Plymouth and the Pilgrims (1856), 204, 231–2.

12. R. Calef, More Wonders of the Invisible World (1700), 152.

13. P.M. Simms, The Bible in America (1936), 337–342.

14. L. I. Newman, Jewish Influence on Christian Reform Movements (1925), 641.

15. P. Masserman and M. Baker, The Jews Come to America (1932), 69.

16. C. Mather, op. cit. I, 109–110.

17. J. Davis, op. cit., 272.

18. G. R. Stewart, Names on the Land (1945), 123 ff.

19. C. E. Whiting, Studies in English Puritanism from the Restoration to the Revelation, 1600–1688 (1931), 445 ff.

20. C. Mather, op. cit. I, 63.

21. G. R. Stewart, loc. cit.

22. L. M. Friedman, Jewish Pioneers and Patriots (1942), 96.

23. Sivan, Gabriel, The Bible and Civilization, Jerusalem: Keter Publishing House, 1973, p. 236.

24. Katsh, Abraham I., The Biblical Heritage of American Democracy, New York: p. 97. Ktav Publishing House, Inc., 1977, Chapter 3 & 5.




RETURN


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
America’s Catholic Colony







By: Matthew E. Bunson


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------







Share on twitterShare on linkedinShare on facebookShare on emailShare on printMore Sharing Services






The history of Colonial England in America is one of great irony: The same Protestant groups who fled England in pursuit of toleration and religious liberty brought with them an utter hatred for the Church. They installed laws and customs that excluded Catholics from all aspects of public life for over a century and a half.

This reality makes the story of Catholics in the first days of Maryland all the more remarkable. From its founding, Maryland was intended to be a place where Catholics were welcomed and permitted to share in the dream of a new life which brought so many others to America. What happened to the Catholics who pursued that dream is a reminder that the freedoms we take for granted today were hard-won by those who came before us.

A Haven for Catholics

As children used to learn in American schools, the first permanent English settlement was made in 1607 at Jamestown, Virginia. Other colonies soon followed along the Atlantic seaboard. In 1620, a group of Pilgrims—ardent Puritans who rejected what they considered Roman influences in the Church of England—left England to escape religious conformity. They sailed from England on the famed Mayflower, arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts, and set about to forge a place for themselves. These two groups, in Virginia and Massachusetts, proved the vanguard of what became the 13 colonies.

The religious toleration that was a hallmark of most of the colonies did not extend to Catholics. Most of the inhabitants of the colonies had grown up in a world filled with animosity for the Church of Rome and were conditioned to fear and despise the Catholic Church by Elizabethan propaganda and England’s struggle against the Catholic powers of Europe. Not surprisingly, then, anti-Catholic laws, disabilities, and hatred permeated almost all of the English colonies. One remarkable exception was Maryland.

Maryland is rightly honored as the one place in the colonies where Catholics could live in comparative religious freedom in America. But even there the freedoms enjoyed by Catholics proved fleeting.

Credit for the Catholic colony belongs to one man: George Calvert, First Lord Baltimore. A talented English business leader and a friend to Kings James I and Charles I, Calvert in 1624 converted to Catholicism. The decision cost him his seat in Parliament and his state office, but he resigned them willingly because he believed so firmly in the truths of the Church. His winning personality also helped him retain favor at the royal court. This proved crucial, as Calvert soon felt the harsh penal laws against Catholics and he committed himself to aiding his fellow believers. One of those ways was through a colony in the New World.

While historians are of differing opinions as to whether Calvert was concerned first and foremost with a commercial enterprise or with a sanctuary for Catholics, the idea of a colony for Catholics soon took shape. The first chosen site was in Newfoundland, but this proved financially impractical (and the winter utterly intolerable). Ironically, too, the fledgling colony was attacked by the nearby Catholic French. Virginia was the next possibility, but the furious resistance of the Protestants blocked the scheme. Undaunted, Calvert petitioned for a charter to start a colony north of Virginia, but he died in April 1632. A few months later, on June 20, 1632, a charter for the Maryland Colony was granted to his son, Caecilius (or Cecil) Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore. The colony was named in honor of Charles I’s queen, Henrietta Maria.

On March 25, 1634, two small ships, the Ark and the Dove, landed at St. Clement’s Island in southern Maryland. On board were the colony’s first settlers, led by Leonard Calvert, Cecil Calvert’s younger brother. The group consisted of 17 gentlemen, their wives, and their households. Most of the servants were Protestants. The first Catholic Mass in the colonies was said by Jesuit Fr. Andrew White; other Jesuits in the group included Fr. John Altham and Br. Thomas Gervase.

Freedom of Religion

But Maryland was not exclusively for Catholics. Calvert was a realist, and he knew that the long-term chances of the colony were better if it observed genuine religious liberty. Calvert was also not stupid. He was aware that from the start the Catholics—even in a Catholic colony—would be outnumbered by Protestants. This meant that that toleration of Catholics would always be precarious, even in a colony founded by them. Prior to their departure to America, then, the first colonists for Maryland were cautioned by Lord Cecil about how they should behave. He declared:


His lord requires his said governor and commissioners that in their voyage to Mary Land they be very careful to preserve unity and peace amongst all the passengers on ship-board, and that they suffer no scandal nor offense to be given to any of the Protestants . . . and that for that end, they cause all acts of Roman Catholic religion to be done as privately as may be, and that they instruct all the Roman Catholics to be silent upon all occasions of discourse concerning matters of religion and that the said governor and commissioners treat the Protestants with as much mildness as justice will permit.

To help insure religious peace, the decree of Calvert was used as the basic modus vivendi in the early years. In effect, before Roger Williams had even fled the intolerant atmosphere of Massachusetts and set up Rhode Island as a haven from the Puritans, Calvert had established Maryland as a place where people of all faiths were welcome.

After five years, a more formal document proved desirable, so in 1639, the Maryland Assembly decreed that "Holy churches within this province shall have all their rights and liberties." The decree was a timely one: In England the political and religious situation was fast deteriorating. Relations between King Charles I and Parliament, always strained, erupted in 1642 in bloody civil war. The grim conflict raged until 1649 when the king was deposed and beheaded, after which the rabid anti-Catholic Oliver Cromwell emerged as Lord Protector from 1653 until his death in 1658.

The colonies in America were themselves convulsed by the upheaval in England, and Calvert’s support of King Charles put Maryland at risk of attack by its Protestant neighbors. The assault came in 1645, led by a Protestant trader and tobacco dealer named Richard Ingle. After his dealings with the Catholic leaders of Maryland soured, he fled the colony and secured support from nearby Protestants and returned with a small anti-Catholic army and the less-than-subtly-named ship Reformation. Ingle attacked St. Mary’s City in 1645 and caused nearly two years of utter chaos. Jesuit priests were seized and sent in chains to England, and Catholic property was plundered and burned. Hated by Catholic and Protestant Marylanders alike, Ingle was given the title of "that ungrateful Villagine." Most Marylanders considered him nothing less than a pirate. At last, Calvert returned with an army in 1646 and restored some semblance of order.

A Diminishing Toleration

To ease the religious situation and encourage settlers to invest in rebuilding the devastated colony, in 1649 the Maryland Assembly passed the "Acts Concerning Religion," generally called the Act of Toleration. Its goal was to prevent religious strife from destroying Maryland. Its terms were fairly simple but still striking. It prohibited the molestation of anyone who professed belief in Jesus Christ and it guaranteed freedom to worship. Written in plain legal language, the decree nevertheless anticipated the principles of religious toleration that became the bedrock of the United States’ approach to religion.

Sadly, the situation in England and the colonies only grew worse in the years after the beheading of King Charles I. The Commonwealth of England that existed from 1649 to 1660 was marked by a return to severe anti-Catholicism, and the same spirit was encouraged in the colonies. In 1654, Protestants overthrew the proprietary government of Maryland. The new regime outlawed the Catholic faith and repealed the Act of Toleration of 1649. Only in 1658 was the Calvert family able to regain control and re-institute the Toleration Act. During the Restoration period and the reign of King Charles II (1661-1685), the Calverts remained in fragile control of the colony. With the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688-1689 and the overthrow of the Catholic King James II, however, the Calverts’ days were numbered. Within two years, Maryland had been seized and declared a royal colony. In 1692 Anglicanism was decreed the official religion of state.

In 1704, the Assembly passed "An Act to Prevent the Growth of Popery within this Province" targeting the Jesuits in Maryland. It forbade any "Popish Bishop, Priest, or Jesuite" from proselytizing, baptizing any person other than those with "Popish Parents," or saying Mass. By another statute in 1704, Mass could be said only in private homes. Additional laws prohibited Catholics from practicing law and from teaching children. Severe taxes were imposed on hiring Irish "Papist" servants as a move to discourage Irish immigration. In 1718, Catholics were stripped of their right to vote as all voters were required to take various test oaths that included deliberately anti-Catholic declarations.

Cradle of Faith

The great Maryland experiment was at an end, and it wasn’t until the middle of the 18th century that Catholics were permitted to practice their faith openly. Still, the courage of the Maryland Catholics had planted the faith permanently in English America. In 1708, there were 2,974 Catholics in Maryland out of a total population of 40,000. By 1785, there were 15,800 Catholics, making them the largest group of Catholics anywhere in the colonies. Out of this cradle of faith emerged some of the most important and revered figures in American Catholic history, including John Carroll, the Father of the American Church and the first bishop and archbishop of Baltimore. But Catholic Maryland also pointed the way to America’s future and the legacy of religious tolerance and pluralism. John Tracy Ellis, the famed historian of American Catholicism, wrote:


For the first time in history there was a real prospect for a duly constituted government under which all Christians would possess equal rights, where all churches would be tolerated, and where none would be the agent of the government . . . to the "land of sanctuary" came Puritans fleeing persecution in Virginia and Anglicans escaping from the same threat in Massachusetts. This policy of religious tolerance has rightly been characterized as "the imperishable glory of Lord Baltimore and of the State." (American Catholicism, 24)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Matthew E. Bunson is a former contributing editor to This Rock and the author of more than 30 books. He is a consultant for USA Today on Catholic matters, a moderator of EWTN’s online Church history forum, and the editor of The Catholic Answer.

more...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:11 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
lemon_fresh wrote:
Adding on to the whole 13 colonies/13 tribes thing, the Pilgrims and many of the other groups saw themselves as Israelites (many, if not most even kept Sabbath, feasts, and ate clean) who were being led across the water to the promised land by God Himself.


THAT! :s_thumbsup


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:13 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
Priest, have you seen the pdf on moedim-honoring Anabaptists from England yet?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
Texas Jon wrote:
Priest, have you seen the pdf on moedim-honoring Anabaptists from England yet?


Nosir, do tell.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:46 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
http://www.friendsofsabbath.org/ABC/Church%20of%20God%20History/Sabbatarian%20Anabaptists.pdf


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 11:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
:shok:

I didn't know that. dunno how I missed it. Thank you.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:04 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
You are welcome, bro. I was thinking about you today when I taught Patrick Henry's speech to the Virginia Convention.

It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

:dirol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
We have no election, if were we so base to desire it......The war is inevitable. Let it come. I repeat sir, let it come.

I've loved that quote since I was a kid. That dude was playing the man.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 8:06 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
Yeah, he was the right stuff...

Some atheist one time tried to tell me Henry was a nonbeliever as well. He poo pooed the fact that Henry repeatedly referred to Almighty God and nature's God, the Creator of Law. Oh well, some folks like to see what they want to I guess...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:36 am
Posts: 355
One of my favorites. I've read through it a lot again lately. I thought I'd share a little more of it.




Quote:
March 23, 1775
By Patrick Henry

No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the house. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the house is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at the truth, and fulfill the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly kings.

Mr. President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the numbers of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth, to know the worst, and to provide for it.

I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging of the future but by the past. And judging by the past, I wish to know what there has been in the conduct of the British ministry for the last ten years to justify those hopes with which gentlemen have been pleased to solace themselves and the House. Is it that insidious smile with which our petition has been lately received?

Trust it not, sir; it will prove a snare to your feet. Suffer not yourselves to be betrayed with a kiss. Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love? Let us not deceive ourselves, sir. These are the implements of war and subjugation; the last arguments to which kings resort. I ask gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlement assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing. We have held the subject up in every light of which it is capable; but it has been all in vain. Shall we resort to entreaty and humble supplication? What terms shall we find which have not been already exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves. Sir, we have done everything that could be done to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned; we have remonstrated; we have supplicated; we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and Parliament. Our petitions have been slighted; our remonstrances have produced additional violence and insult; our supplications have been disregarded; and we have been spurned, with contempt, from the foot of the throne! In vain, after these things, may we indulge the fond hope of peace and reconciliation.

There is no longer any room for hope. If we wish to be free--if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending--if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained--we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of hosts is all that is left us! They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year? Will it be when we are totally disarmed, and when a British guard shall be stationed in every house? Shall we gather strength by irresolution and inaction? Shall we acquire the means of effectual resistance by lying supinely on our backs and hugging the delusive phantom of hope, until our enemies shall have bound us hand and foot? Sir, we are not weak if we make a proper use of those means which the God of nature hath placed in our power. The millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us. Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave. Besides, sir, we have no election. If we were base enough to desire it, it is now too late to retire from the contest. There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston! The war is inevitable--and let it come! I repeat it, sir, let it come.

It is in vain, sir, to extentuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace--but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish? What would they have? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

_________________
Joshua 24:14-15


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 7:36 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
Alright, so when do we three secede from the Union? Texas is a Republic, after all... :biggrin:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
This exerpt makes my neck hair stand on end.

Quote:
I ask gentlemen, sir, what means this martial array, if its purpose be not to force us to submission? Can gentlement assign any other possible motive for it? Has Great Britain any enemy, in this quarter of the world, to call for all this accumulation of navies and armies? No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging. And what have we to oppose to them? Shall we try argument? Sir, we have been trying that for the last ten years. Have we anything new to offer upon the subject? Nothing
.

The three suscesketeers....that's us. :s_cool :s_cool :s_cool I vote we wears shades....


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:12 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
I'm way ahead of you on those shades, but Temu beats me on his killer Cali surfer digs:

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:01 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:35 am
Posts: 1703
Location: On a mountain; at your side.
I've been concerned about how I can make my Texas brethren feel more at home when they come to visit, yet not offend them with our casual wear...after all, I too wear cowboy boots, as seen below...

Image

But before any y'all Texans plan a trip out this way, please send your boot sizes to me in advance so I can hook you up, Texas style...

Image

_________________
I give Christians wedgies

Asher hayah v'hoveh v'yavo!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 11:56 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
THAT is so damned hilarious! I am 10 in Ariats and 10.5 in Justins :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Politics
PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:09 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:35 am
Posts: 1703
Location: On a mountain; at your side.
Texas Jon wrote:
THAT is so damned hilarious! I am 10 in Ariats and 10.5 in Justins :)


Ariats is how I roll these days; used to be Lama's. 10's it is, then.

:s_cool

_________________
I give Christians wedgies

Asher hayah v'hoveh v'yavo!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 51 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Forum hosting by ProphpBB | Software by phpBB | Report Abuse | Privacy