Joyfully Growing in Grace and Torah

Growing in Him
It is currently Thu Aug 24, 2017 12:38 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
I had planned on planting my perennial seeds in the fall so they would lay in the ground dormant for the winter, then emerge in the Spring. Well that ain't happening. I am not feeling so good lately and do well to take care of myself, much less spend the day in the cold weather gardening.

I thought if I planted them in fall it would give them a jump start on blooming and stuff because many perennials do not bloom till the 2nd year.

After much research, I still feel like I know nothing. LOL

I did not get many of these seeds in the ground last Spring and Summer because it took me months of buying a few types here and a few there, to get a large selection, though I did get a nice culinary herb garden started.

I do have a green house, and many perennial seeds can withstand freeze and frost.

I guess what I am needing is some experienced herb growers to tell me their successes and downfalls in starting a perennial medicinal herb garden. What worked, and what didn't.

I have fever few, St.Johns Wort, Valerian, Hyssop, Echinnacea, Pink Mallow, and other stuff.

Which ones do well if frozen in ice trays of water, which ones do well in the crisper of the fridge and which ones do well just sprinkled on the ground in the fall?

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:38 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
Wait until first of March. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 7:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Texas Jon wrote:
Wait until first of March. :)


Will some of them flower the 1st year? What is the rule of thumb on that or all they all different?

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 8:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 10:23 pm
Posts: 73
I wish that I could help you but I can't - sorry.

I would use the green house since you have one. Can you do an internet search?

Cate

_________________
Adieu


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 9:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
Some seeds require a period of freezing before they'll sprout. I don't know what you have for seeds, but if you do, you can google them to find out what the growing requirement are. If anything requires a period of feezing, you can put those into the freezer for the winter and take them out in the spring and plant them.

Some people save those quart size clear cellophane containers you get strawberries in. Put soil, add seed, close lid and put them outside on the back porch during cold weather to freeze. In the spring, they act as little green houses and seeds begin to sprout. I've not tried it but have read about it.

As far as plants that bloom during the second year..that's what they do! You plant them one year and they bloom the next year. If you plant them in the spring, they will bloom next year. They will GROW the year you plant them, but won't bloom till the following year. I think those are called Biennials or something like that.

I hope that helps.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:01 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
Rule of thumb is wait until flowering herbs have sufficient sunlight and heat. If you have a decently sealed greenhouse or an old fridge that you outfit with a hydroponic setup as I've seen on youtube, then it does not matter, but outdoors is another thing. The only seeds that I know of that you should be planting right now are the greens, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, etc. Perhaps some of your herbs are cold hearty. It should tell you on the back of the seed pack maybe. My current fear is Monsantos seed. Hybrids, etc. Bad news is organically grown corn chicken feed products is so darned expensive!

There was a thread where Priest showed a video to a guy that I just really, really dug, and he might say you can grow anything anytime if you grow it in heavy composted mulch...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 5:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
ok, I was just thinking how the wildflowers do and thought if I planted seeds now, they would lay dormant and grow next Spring like the wild flowers. I guess I will just wait and propagate them next Spring.

You can plant cabbage stuff now? It will last the winter and do next Spring. I have some large cauliflower plants that have not made cauliflower, will they go dormant and do next Spring?

I do have some experience gardening, but that was in the deep South. It is totally different up here, plus I am growing things that I never tried before.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
I don't want to contradict anybody...but having grown up in New England, well, it's too cold there for winter gardens unless you have a greenhouse or cloach system. I think you get pretty cold there too as in 40 below at times...Crocus doesn't even like to pop up till closer to the end of March and April during a cold year in NE. That would be equivalent to Feb. where I live now.

The wild flower seeds will do just fine if you plant them in the spring unless they need the frost and snow cover for germination. Some seeds do need that but I couldn't tell you off the top of my head exactly which ones. I think poppies are like that. My daughter has them growing wild through out the ranch in Wyoming..fields full..looks like the wizard of oz poppy fields there at times in the spring lol! Some seeds need to have dark to germinate in addition to freezing weather, but, you can't bury them in dirt. Snow cover is sufficient as well as tufts of grass and leaves.

Lilacs must have the cold AND the moisture or else they don't like to bloom. They aren't very fond of Florida for that reason.

So, when it comes to your herbs, look each one up on line and see what ideal is for the seed and plant. Some herbs like shade, some want full sun. Some want poor soil with excellent drainage (like sand) and some want rich loam. Some want water and some want only a little. Once you know what they want, then you organize your beds for similar growing conditions. You don't want to put a water lover with a desert lover.

Herbs tend to be pretty forgiving in that many will thrive in variable conditions.

Some can even grow in your house beautifully if the light, temperature and soil are close to what they enjoy when outside. I have a beautiful rosemary plant growing like crazy in a pot in my house. I put him outside when it's warm. I have a pot of chives that I have to keep clipping because he's so happy. he grows several inches a week! And, I have a pineapple plant that I sprouted back in January from a pineapple I bough at the store.

I've been successful at sprouting celery also, and them planting it out doors where it wanted to take over the herb bed. I dug it up in the fall and it had a bulb that would shame a cantelope! I sprout my own sweet potato slips too. Jerusalem artichokes from the store will plant nicely. They'll grow 6 feet tall and 4 feet wide so they make a nice hedge. Everybody will ask where you got the giant daisy plants! Dig them up in the fall and you're bound to miss a few..and they'll sprout next year!

Anyway, have fun!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 15, 2012 2:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
I don't want to contradict anybody...but having grown up in New England, well, it's too cold there for winter gardens unless you have a greenhouse or cloach system. I think you get pretty cold there too as in 40 below at times...Crocus doesn't even like to pop up till closer to the end of March and April during a cold year in NE. That would be equivalent to Feb. where I live now.

The wild flower seeds will do just fine if you plant them in the spring unless they need the frost and snow cover for germination. Some seeds do need that but I couldn't tell you off the top of my head exactly which ones. I think poppies are like that. My daughter has them growing wild through out the ranch in Wyoming..fields full..looks like the wizard of oz poppy fields there at times in the spring lol! Some seeds need to have dark to germinate in addition to freezing weather, but, you can't bury them in dirt. Snow cover is sufficient as well as tufts of grass and leaves.

Lilacs must have the cold AND the moisture or else they don't like to bloom. They aren't very fond of Florida for that reason.

So, when it comes to your herbs, look each one up on line and see what ideal is for the seed and plant. Some herbs like shade, some want full sun. Some want poor soil with excellent drainage (like sand) and some want rich loam. Some want water and some want only a little. Once you know what they want, then you organize your beds for similar growing conditions. You don't want to put a water lover with a desert lover.

Herbs tend to be pretty forgiving in that many will thrive in variable conditions.

Some can even grow in your house beautifully if the light, temperature and soil are close to what they enjoy when outside. I have a beautiful rosemary plant growing like crazy in a pot in my house. I put him outside when it's warm. I have a pot of chives that I have to keep clipping because he's so happy. he grows several inches a week! And, I have a pineapple plant that I sprouted back in January from a pineapple I bough at the store.

I've been successful at sprouting celery also, and them planting it out doors where it wanted to take over the herb bed. I dug it up in the fall and it had a bulb that would shame a cantelope! I sprout my own sweet potato slips too. Jerusalem artichokes from the store will plant nicely. They'll grow 6 feet tall and 4 feet wide so they make a nice hedge. Everybody will ask where you got the giant daisy plants! Dig them up in the fall and you're bound to miss a few..and they'll sprout next year!

Anyway, have fun!!


Thank you. I am always up to growing unusual things. I never considered the artichoke. I am also going to plant sweet potatoes next year. I had decided to do as you said; just research each one. I planted elephant garlic a few days ago. :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 2:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
Are you aware of the differences between Jerusalem artichokes and the green spikey ones? One is similar to a potato and grows under ground. The other grows on a plant above ground.

I'm only asking because some folks don't know and I can't assume...

Also, some spices are plantable too. Like dill and poppy seeds. I've used whole dehydrated peas (not the split ones) when I wanted to plant a lot of peas..it was cheaper to buy them from the bean department than the garden dept.

I've also planted navy beans for string beans. A friend of mine planted raw peanuts and got a crop. Prolly too cool and short seasoned for your area, but they do grow.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 16, 2012 9:00 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
All I know is, you know the end is near when CALIFORNIA of all places can't pass a referendum against GMO crap.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 3:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
Are you aware of the differences between Jerusalem artichokes and the green spikey ones? One is similar to a potato and grows under ground. The other grows on a plant above ground.

I'm only asking because some folks don't know and I can't assume...

Also, some spices are plantable too. Like dill and poppy seeds. I've used whole dehydrated peas (not the split ones) when I wanted to plant a lot of peas..it was cheaper to buy them from the bean department than the garden dept.

I've also planted navy beans for string beans. A friend of mine planted raw peanuts and got a crop. Prolly too cool and short seasoned for your area, but they do grow.

I was not ware, Thank you.

I have an idea. My craft/sewing room, stays warm. So,along my work bench in there (around 3'6'), I am going to hang some grow lights and start a few seeds from each pack and see what happens. :) It would be a fun project. I could get a timer for the lights cheap.

Dog needs to go out. brb

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:04 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 11:35 am
Posts: 1703
Location: On a mountain; at your side.
Texas Jon wrote:
All I know is, you know the end is near when CALIFORNIA of all places can't pass a referendum against GMO crap.


Odd thing, that. Was handily being beaten in all the polls...right up to voting day. I don't think it was the voters that beat it down Texas.

_________________
I give Christians wedgies

Asher hayah v'hoveh v'yavo!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 8:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
Quote:
I have an idea. My craft/sewing room, stays warm. So,along my work bench in there (around 3'6'), I am going to hang some grow lights and start a few seeds from each pack and see what happens. It would be a fun project. I could get a timer for the lights cheap.


That should work!!

When I start herbs indoors in flats, I place a sheet of clear plastic on the soil. I don't tuck it in or anything, just put it on the soil. It can takes a few weeks for herbs to sprout..2-3 weeks..As soon as you see sprouts, take off the plastic. It shortens up the sprouting time.

As your plants get a tad larger, add a fan to strengthen the stems. A breeze is a good thing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
My sister is doing that. She has a nice little garden under a grow lamp in the basement. She has some carrots, and herbs. :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
Quote:
I have an idea. My craft/sewing room, stays warm. So,along my work bench in there (around 3'6'), I am going to hang some grow lights and start a few seeds from each pack and see what happens. It would be a fun project. I could get a timer for the lights cheap.


That should work!!

When I start herbs indoors in flats, I place a sheet of clear plastic on the soil. I don't tuck it in or anything, just put it on the soil. It can takes a few weeks for herbs to sprout..2-3 weeks..As soon as you see sprouts, take off the plastic. It shortens up the sprouting time.

As your plants get a tad larger, add a fan to strengthen the stems. A breeze is a good thing.


Hey great idea about the plastic. Thanks for the tips. :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
I thought you might enjoy this site. I found it tonight when I decided to a
make a pitcher of lemon balm tea for our guests for Thanksgiving. I had the lemon balm (dried) in a glass canning jar from a couple of years ago when I grew it, but have never made any.

I was looking up how to make the tea ..proportions of herb to water...and that's how I found this site.

http://suite101.com/article/how-to-make ... ea-a148110

So, I made some and added just a little honey ...it's delicious!! Tastes a lot like chamomile.

It's very easy to grow. It will go wild on you..not like catnip or mint does, but it thrives and gets bushy..smells sooo wonderful. Great for calming, helps sleep, is a natural antiviral, helps fight coldsores..a bunch a stuffs :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 9:29 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
VW, we're gagging on jerusalem artichokes :D If you want some roots to plant, I'd be glad to send you some.

Also, you can get plastic lids for flats. They act like a little greenhouse over the flat. It's always nice to keep some flats growing indoors in front of our windows. It gives us something to nurture and livens up the house during the winter doldrums. I have oodles of flats and plastic lids. If you want some jerusalem artichokes I can put some flats in too and send it all to you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 1:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
I thought you might enjoy this site. I found it tonight when I decided to a
make a pitcher of lemon balm tea for our guests for Thanksgiving. I had the lemon balm (dried) in a glass canning jar from a couple of years ago when I grew it, but have never made any.

I was looking up how to make the tea ..proportions of herb to water...and that's how I found this site.

http://suite101.com/article/how-to-make ... ea-a148110

So, I made some and added just a little honey ...it's delicious!! Tastes a lot like chamomile.

It's very easy to grow. It will go wild on you..not like catnip or mint does, but it thrives and gets bushy..smells sooo wonderful. Great for calming, helps sleep, is a natural antiviral, helps fight coldsores..a bunch a stuffs :)


Thank you :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 1:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
priest wrote:
VW, we're gagging on jerusalem artichokes :D If you want some roots to plant, I'd be glad to send you some.

Also, you can get plastic lids for flats. They act like a little greenhouse over the flat. It's always nice to keep some flats growing indoors in front of our windows. It gives us something to nurture and livens up the house during the winter doldrums. I have oodles of flats and plastic lids. If you want some jerusalem artichokes I can put some flats in too and send it all to you.


That would be nice. Thank you.

I got my grow room ready. I am going to put my green and yellow peepers in there that I brought in for the winter. I am going to go through my herb seeds and see what I can get started.

I am trying to get as big of a variety in my garden as possible so artichokes would be awesome.

I would pay you for postage costs.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2012 10:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
PM to you VW.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:41 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:20 pm
Posts: 2476
Jerusalem artichokes..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_artichoke

Give them LOTS of room..they make a beautiful privacy border. (dual benefit plant)

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-1-a.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 4:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
Jerusalem artichokes..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_artichoke

Give them LOTS of room..they make a beautiful privacy border. (dual benefit plant)

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-1-a.html



Oooh I love it. Yes, I definitely have areas where they can be allowed to just take over. Fertile soil is not a problem. I love any herb that makes pretty flowers.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 4:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
I had never heard of Jerusalem artichokes. I am a big potato eater, so I bet I will like them and they would be good in soups.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 4:10 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2011 12:43 pm
Posts: 2177
They sure are yummy to me! :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 4:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Image

Can the leaves be poisonous to chickens? I would love to do a nice hedge along the front of the pen. I know this would take time, but I have nothing but time. LOL

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2011 10:35 pm
Posts: 548
Vectorwoman wrote:
Image

Can the leaves be poisonous to chickens? I would love to do a nice hedge along the front of the pen. I know this would take time, but I have nothing but time. LOL


You'll be surprised how well they make a vegetative wall. A couple of growing cycles and you have it. I went from about a dozen pieces of root in one row last year to a sixty foot row this year and we still had lots to eat. The first years plants were so thick that they were both a light and visual barrier. By next year I doubt we'll be able to see through that area at all. We have another 30 foot row of a different variety that just exploded this year. It'll turn into a hundred foot row for next year.

They are beautiful too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
priest wrote:
Vectorwoman wrote:
Image

Can the leaves be poisonous to chickens? I would love to do a nice hedge along the front of the pen. I know this would take time, but I have nothing but time. LOL


You'll be surprised how well they make a vegetative wall. A couple of growing cycles and you have it. I went from about a dozen pieces of root in one row last year to a sixty foot row this year and we still had lots to eat. The first years plants were so thick that they were both a light and visual barrier. By next year I doubt we'll be able to see through that area at all. We have another 30 foot row of a different variety that just exploded this year. It'll turn into a hundred foot row for next year.

They are beautiful too.


Sounds awesome.I had considered bamboo, very very invasive to the environment though. I like that though these might be invasive, they are food, and pretty. I have lots of areas I would like to have visual barriers. Sounds like a great project for the next few years. :)

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
Judith wrote:
I don't want to contradict anybody...but having grown up in New England, well, it's too cold there for winter gardens unless you have a greenhouse or cloach system. I think you get pretty cold there too as in 40 below at times...Crocus doesn't even like to pop up till closer to the end of March and April during a cold year in NE. That would be equivalent to Feb. where I live now...


I am not wanting a winter garden. it is way too cold here for that. Wi. I just thought if I went ahead and planted seeds, they would do like the wild flowers do. I know some will and some won't. The ground is freezing now, so I will just be patient and wait till spring and maybe plant a few small things inside.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 1:49 pm
Posts: 1396
The Jer. artichoke roots. Do they have to be planted right away? Or will they keep in the basement till spring? I can see me try to grow them indoors. LOL We have large over hangs around the cabin so windows don't seem to work great, though they work. I have a large South facing window (patio doors that we don't use, that does the best. That would be pretty if they would grow there. I have 5 gall/buckets.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 33 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron

Forum hosting by ProphpBB | Software by phpBB | Report Abuse | Privacy