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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 11:18 am 
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Found this at yahoo:

http://voices.yahoo.com/how-flour-dry-goods-long-term-storage-11293640.html?cat=22

I recently read about people oven canning flour. I am an avid canner, and I also buy flour in bulk. I was intrigued by the 15-20 year storage life for canned dry goods. If you like sales and buying extra flour, rice, dried beans and cornmeal, this may be a great help to you! You don't need a pressure canner, just your oven.

How to Can Flour and Dry Goods

The oven needs to heat to 200 degrees before you start oven canning. Use pint, quart or half gallon glass jars. Make sure to have the right lids and bands to fit the jars. Fill the jars with flour or your desired dry goods. Place a cookie sheet in the oven and start putting your filled jars on it. The cookie sheet helps keep the jars from tipping over in the oven.

Leave the filled jars in the oven for one hour. Put towels on the counter to protect it from the hot jars. Use hot mitts to remove one jar. Carefully wipe the rim with a damp, not wet, paper or kitchen towel. Place lid on and screw the band firmly in place. Carefully grab another jar and repeat procedure. As the jars cool, they should start "clicking". That means they are sealed. Let cool completely and label what is in the jar.

Be extremely careful when handling these hot jars.

What can be oven canned?

Dried goods like rice, oatmeal, whole wheat flour, white flour, potato flakes and cake mixes can all be canned. Some cereals and dried fruits and vegetables can be oven canned. Products that can not be oven canned are those who contain oil, as in walnuts. The oil will go rancid using this method.

What are the advantages of oven canning dry goods?

Oven canning flour is an excellent way to prolong the shelf life of the product. It also kills bugs and eggs that may not be visible to the eye. If you have been keeping your dry goods in the freezer, it frees up freezer space for perishables. It is an excellent way to take advantage of bargain prices.

Check with your extension office to get their advice. This article only pertains to dry foods, not wet.
========================================

Nutshell version:
Oven @ 200*F filled X1hr
cap-off, let cool
dry goods only


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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 2:24 pm 
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Thank you, Judith!!!

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PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 6:56 pm 
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Cool! :biggrin: Thanks sis!


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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 3:35 am 
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Great tip thanks.

I would like to add, that I always nuke my flour and grain for around 45 seconds. I feel, that is sufficient to kill any weevil eggs. I do not have room to freeze it.

I had weevils get into my grain stockpile, years ago. Not fun.

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