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 Post subject: Dehydrating/storing eggs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2012 8:23 pm 
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I've had some excellent results dehydrating eggs. I don't care for canned dried eggs..they taste absolutely nasty and they tend to ruin even your recipes...at least that's my opinion.

I found out why the commercially powdered eggs tend to be so nasty, and that's because it's usually devoid of yolks. Yolks are where the fats in eggs reside and fats are what tends to spoil first.

At home and for myself, for my own purposes, here's what I like to do.

I get the freshest eggs I can get, crack them open into the blender and scramble them gently. You just want them well mixed, not frothy. I pour a thin layer on the plastic jelly trays you can get for dehydrators, and dehydrate them till crisp. Put the dried egg into a blender and blend the heck of them till powdered. Place into a sterile jar, cap it off and put it into the freezer.

Again, you'll have to play with the powder to water ratio when reconstituting ..I can't remember now but I think it was one tablespoon of powder to 2 tablespoons of water. It's been a lot of years and so my memory isn't that great. Let it all set for a bit, after mixing with the water to make sure it all reconstitutes.

Mine have kept for up to a year that way and might even have kept longer, except that I used them up.

I've been known to freeze eggs as well. I love the nice neat little container that nature provides when eggs are born :) Just pop them into the freezer as is! They WILL crack and that's ok. The shells still provide a protective barrier against freezer burn. After they freeze in the carton, pop them into a freezer baggie.

I tried pouring them scrambled into ice cube trays, but removing them from the trays is a problem. They want to stick. It's really a lot simpler and easier to just leave them in the shells. An egg is an egg and you don't have to wonder if you have the right amount if they're in the shell. Just don't plan on frying them as you would a whole fresh egg...use for recipes and scrambled eggs, omlets and such.

If you want to preserve eggs without dehydrating or freezing, the best are fresh from the hen who has been made happy by the rooster (fertile eggs). Don't wash them. Don't rinse them. If they are dirty, go ahead and clean them but use them up first, and then do what it takes so that the nests are clean to prevent that.


Store them in the fridge at around 45*F and they're good for several months.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:31 pm 
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Yup, need a thanks button. I am on another little forum and was told the creator of it are having issues with the thanks button.

:good: :good: :good:


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:22 pm 
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Judith wrote:
I've had some excellent results dehydrating eggs. I don't care for canned dried eggs..they taste absolutely nasty and they tend to ruin even your recipes...at least that's my opinion.

I found out why the commercially powdered eggs tend to be so nasty, and that's because it's usually devoid of yolks. Yolks are where the fats in eggs reside and fats are what tends to spoil first.

At home and for myself, for my own purposes, here's what I like to do.

I get the freshest eggs I can get, crack them open into the blender and scramble them gently. You just want them well mixed, not frothy. I pour a thin layer on the plastic jelly trays you can get for dehydrators, and dehydrate them till crisp. Put the dried egg into a blender and blend the heck of them till powdered. Place into a sterile jar, cap it off and put it into the freezer.

Again, you'll have to play with the powder to water ratio when reconstituting ..I can't remember now but I think it was one tablespoon of powder to 2 tablespoons of water. It's been a lot of years and so my memory isn't that great. Let it all set for a bit, after mixing with the water to make sure it all reconstitutes.

Mine have kept for up to a year that way and might even have kept longer, except that I used them up.

I've been known to freeze eggs as well. I love the nice neat little container that nature provides when eggs are born :) Just pop them into the freezer as is! They WILL crack and that's ok. The shells still provide a protective barrier against freezer burn. After they freeze in the carton, pop them into a freezer baggie.

I tried pouring them scrambled into ice cube trays, but removing them from the trays is a problem. They want to stick. It's really a lot simpler and easier to just leave them in the shells. An egg is an egg and you don't have to wonder if you have the right amount if they're in the shell. Just don't plan on frying them as you would a whole fresh egg...use for recipes and scrambled eggs, omlets and such.

If you want to preserve eggs without dehydrating or freezing, the best are fresh from the hen who has been made happy by the rooster (fertile eggs). Don't wash them. Don't rinse them. If they are dirty, go ahead and clean them but use them up first, and then do what it takes so that the nests are clean to prevent that.


Store them in the fridge at around 45*F and they're good for several months.


Wow! Now, THAT'S pretty interesting! I have fantastic reds that will lay the heck out of em, and wife is of the opinion that we have TOO MANY CHICKENS! hehehe...

I told her, what if the SHTF, and the neighbors came a' knocking, starving to death. Then, do we have too many chickens?

The ONE question in my mind is how to differentiate between the enemy who wants to thwart and destroy, and the poor legitimate neighbor who needs help?

:( :?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:40 pm 
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Here's a link with info on long term egg storage without freezing, and the results of various methods using various eggs.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Sustainable-Farming/1977-11-01/Fresh-Eggs.aspx?page=4

Too many things can happen to chickens. Sometimes they just up and die for no apparent cause. Sometimes you can even do CPR on them and revive them lol! yep..btdt It's always good to keep a good flock of them in my opinion. The more flexible the variety of chicken, the better too! You have a variety of human food, animal food and even bone meal for your garden :)

With enough chickens, you might even make friends of your enemies..specially if you can supply them with chicks :)


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:42 pm 
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Haven't looked it up yet but saw on one of the Doomsday Prepper shows this lady who saves her eggs by rubbing them in oil. They last for a year or more.

If you see it come on, she is the one who is dark haired, chunky and laughed that she would be the only one after a SHTF who still needed to lose 100 lbs.

As for the friend or foe, you will have to be listening to that still small voice inside to guide you. :angelwings:


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2012 6:43 pm 
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In the article, they tried lard and didn't see that it helped any. Of all the ones they did, frige was best bet for unwashed, fertile eggs.


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